Give Your Stress Wings And Let It Fly Away

Stress (and its cousin anxiety) is your body's way of responding to any kind of demand or threat. When you sense danger—whether it's real or imagined—the body's defenses kick into high gear in a rapid, automatic process known as the “fight-or-flight” reaction or the "stress response." The stress response is the body's way of protecting you.

Stress is created by a part of the brain called the amygdala, which is responsible for the production of fear. When the brain perceives a threat, it sends fear production into overdrive.The subconscious, in turn, reads this chemical change and puts us into a heightened state of alarm. This is the ‘fight or flight’ protection that we see in prey animals that are constantly alert to the threat of predators.

This is all well and good if you’re the kind of mammal that has eyes at the side of its head, but less useful for humans, who aren’t designed to exist in a constantly elevated state of alarm. It raises the heart rate, redirects oxygen and blood to the areas that need to operate well for protection – and shuts down every other non-essential function that might interfere with the ability to keep us safe.

This is all well and good if you’re the kind of mammal that has eyes at the side of its head, but less useful for humans, who aren’t designed to exist in a constantly elevated state of alarm. It raises the heart rate, redirects oxygen and blood to the areas that need to operate well for protection – and shuts down every other non-essential function that might interfere with the ability to keep us safe.

In short, short bursts of anxiety or stress help to keep us safe, constant stress puts us at physical and emotional risk. In our hectic modern lives, demanding jobs, financial worries and health concerns have replaced the threats faced by our ancestors, but our natural response to those threats hasn’t changed. Symptoms of stress and anxiety can include:

  • Feelings of constant pressure or being hassled and hurried

  • Irritability and moodiness

  • Stomach problems, headaches, and sometimes chest pain

  • Allergic reactions, such as eczema or asthma

  • Problems sleeping

  • Negative attitudes to food, alcohol, smoking, or drugs

  • Sadness or depression

  • Feelings of constant pressure or being hassled and hurried

  • Irritability and moodiness

  • Stomach problems, headaches, and sometimes chest pain

  • Allergic reactions, such as eczema or asthma

  • Problems sleeping

  • Negative attitudes to food, alcohol, smoking, or drugs

  • Sadness or depression

So how can acupuncture for stress help?

 

Acupuncture for stress and anxiety is an approach which has been proven to be effective in re-setting the body’s natural energy flow and significantly reducing the physical and emotional effects of living life on a constant psychological knife-edge.

Stress, anxiety, depression and other strong emotions interrupt the flow of energy throughout the body. Acupuncture, aims to address these energy blockages and establish a smooth flow of energy, alleviating not only the symptoms of stress and anxiety, but the stress and anxiety itself.

By releasing endorphins – the brain’s natural pain-killing chemicals – acupuncture improves body chemistry and has a positive effect on the circulation of blood throughout the body. This oxygenates the tissues, cycling out cortisol and other waste chemicals. The calming nature of acupuncture for stress also decreases heart rate, lowers blood pressure and relaxes the muscles.

Atrium Acupuncture

07715422767

Dalston

Studio 5 

450 Kingsland Road

E8 5HH